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Blues tackle The Big Issue

Danielle Balales, Carlton Media  December 8, 2016 3:54 PM

Harry McKay, Dennis Armfield and Jed Lamb headed down to Bourke Street Mall on Thursday to help a local vendor sell copies of The Big Issue. (Photo: Dennis Armfield)

Harry McKay, Dennis Armfield and Jed Lamb headed down to Bourke Street Mall on Thursday to help a local vendor sell copies of The Big Issue. (Photo: Dennis Armfield)

Carlton’s Dennis Armfield, Jed Lamb and Harry McKay were kitted up on Thursday afternoon, but it wasn’t in footy gear.

Armed with a red hat, hi-vis vest and a satchel of magazines, the trio hit Bourke Street Mall to sell copies of The Big Issue Magazine.

It’s the second year in a row Blues players have volunteered their time to help raise money for vendors around Victoria.

Braving the wind and the rain – not to mention hundreds of Christmas shoppers – McKay said it was a really rewarding experience.

“When the opportunity came up to help out and sell The Big Issue Christmas Edition, I thought it was a great chance to give something back to the community,” McKay said.

“The Big Issue is such an iconic magazine and helps a range of people get back on their feet, and the best thing is you know that money goes straight into the vendor’s pocket.”

The Big Issue CEO Steven Persson says the campaign aims to shine a spotlight on hundreds of vendors selling The Big Issue on street corners around the country.

“Many of our vendors are big football fans and this campaign will allow them to celebrate Christmas with players they admire. We hope the clubs’ participation will help vendors sell extra copies of the magazine and receive a much-needed boost in time for the holidays,” Persson said.

The Big Issue Christmas Edition is on sale from 2 – 25 December. 

Vendors buy copies of The Big Issue for $3.50 and sell them for $7, earning the $3.50 difference from each sale. More than 6,500 men and women have sold The Big Issue since it launched in Australia 20 years ago, collectively earning $24 million.